Richard Guisick

Tredyffrin Township Police Department update on local substance issues, including the use of NARCAN

NARCANEarlier this week, I wrote the post, “Depression, alcoholism and drug addiction…Saving lives is the Answer”.  Completely by coincidence, on Wednesday, July 21, we learned that the Tredyffrin Township police had arrested Lynne Twaddle, age 61 of Pugh Road on suspicion of dealing heroin from her Wayne home.

Twaddle was charged with possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver, criminal conspiracy, possession of drug paraphernalia and criminal use of a communication facility (phone).  Beyond scary is the fact that Twaddle’s house is located 150 ft. from the entrance drive to New Eagle Elementary School.

At the time of the Twaddle’s arrest, Tredyffrin Township Detective Sgt. Todd Bereda commented, “It’s just now with the change in society, we’re seeing a burgeoning amount of oxycodone and opiate use, it starts with pills and ends up with heroin.”

As a follow-up to the post on Community Matters, I received an email from Tredyffrin Township Police Superintendent Anthony Giaimo and was given permission to share it.  Valuable information, the public needs to know that the Tredyffrin Police are actively involved and continuously seeking ways to combat the growing local drug abuse problems.

Greetings Pattye –

Thank you for your recent post regarding substance issues within our community (and beyond). We need to spread the word!

We have seen drug related tragedies among our young residents year after year.

We have taken a number of progressive steps, which have gained the attention of Commonwealth officials.

We were the first in the Commonwealth of PA (with ARCH) to acquire and maintain a drug “turn in” box. Additionally we have hosted town hall meetings (Kacie’s Cause) and are continuous attendees and participants at ARCH meetings.

We are presently formulating new educational programs through our Community Policing Unit.

One resource that has received excellent feedback is our new Crime Watch program. On this site, I posted a Parent’s Tool kit, suicide prevention and drug / substance abuse resources as well as other resources posted by our Community Policing Director Rhonda Carroll. Our site can be found through the township website or at www.tredyffrinpd.org (There is also a mobile app).

T/E School Board Director Liz Mercogliano mentioned the possible use of NARCAN, heroin antidote naloxone, in treating drug overdoses in a comment on Community Matters.  The public should know that the Tredyffrin police are trained in the use of NARCAN. I received a follow-email from Supt. Giaimo clarifying the department’s usage of the heroin antidote:

A number of people have asked if the police department uses NARCAN, an opiate antagonist, to combat the potential loss of life from a heroin over dose. I can say that we not only have this drug in all of the police cars but were on the leading edge of this program. To date we already saved a life with the use of NARCAN.

Rest assured we (I) will keep up the pace to keep our community safe from this deadly drug influence.

As we learned from Supt. Giaimo, the Tredyffrin police have already saved one life with the use of NARCAN.

If residents have concerns and/or questions regarding substance abuse, you are asked to contact Tredyffrin Township Police Officer Rhonda Carroll, Director of Community Policing, Tel. 610.644.3221.

Following the arrest of suspected heroin dealer Lynne Twaddle, the T/E School District posted the following message on their website, www.tesd.org

As you may have read in the news, on July 21 the Tredyffrin Township Police arrested a District resident for alleged sale of heroin. We congratulate the police on their continued efforts to combat the distribution of illegal drugs, and we cooperate as needed. The alleged perpetrator lives in close proximity to New Eagle Elementary School, but I have been assured by Superintendent of Police Anthony Giaimo that although the investigation is ongoing, there is no connection between this arrest and any T/E students at this time.

The District will continue to implement and extend safety measures to promote greater security in our schools. Such measures include but are not limited to buzz-in systems at school entrances with video capabilities, external fencing, improved locks on classroom doors, external window signage, and updated emergency preparedness procedures. Additionally, we continue to provide age-appropriate educational opportunities and support programs across the curriculum for students to learn about the negative consequences associated with illegal and prescription drug use and abuse. I thank the community for its continued support of these District efforts.

Best wishes,
Richard Gusick
Superintendent of Schools

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Multi-million T/E budget surplus (again) – $12.4 million surplus in 4 years! Property tax increases for 10 years in a row and still no health insurance for aides/paras!

budget surplusIn spite of $12.4 million in budget surplus the last four years, TESD residents have seen yearly tax increase and yet sadly, the District still does not provide health insurance coverage to their aides and paras.

I have regularly attended school board meetings and associated finance meetings the last 4 years and I have been amazed at the yearly District budget surplus. This week at the Finance Committee meeting, we learned that once again, the District has a multi-million budget surplus – yes, a review of the 2013-14 budget indicates a surplus of $2.2 million.

Thought it would be interesting to review the District’s budget surplus for the last four years. The surplus schedule is as follows:

2013-14: $2.2 million
2012-13: $5.0 million
2011-12: $3.9 million
2010-11: $1.3 million
Total: $12.4 million

Where exactly does the budget surplus go each year? We know that it does not go the cost to providing healthcare to all District employees. The aides and paras remain without health insurance, the residents continue to receive yearly tax increases and the surplus feeds the ever-increasing District’s fund balance. According to the District, as of July 1, the fund balance has grown to $32 million! Remember, the fund balance growth represents surplus from the District’s yearly budget. It would be surprising if this isn’t the largest fund balance of any school district in the state.

I truly struggle to understand how the District manages to add multi-million dollar budget surplus to the fund balance over the years but the residents continue to feel the sting of an annual tax increase. I recall the District’s business manager Art McDonnell’s explanation of the whopping $5 million surplus last year – primarily due to reduced health insurance premium costs for employees. Clearly, last year was not a fluke when you review the mega-millions in budget surplus over the years.

It would be easier to accept the yearly budget surplus if we did not also have a tax increase each year. In fact, you would have to go back a decade to 2004-05 to find the last time that there was no increase. A review of the District yearly tax increase since the last no-tax year is as follows:

• 2014-15: 3.4%
• 2013-14: 1.7%
• 2012-13: 3.3%
• 2011-12: 3.77%
• 2010-11: 2.9%
• 2009-10: 2.95%
• 2008-09: 4.37%
• 2007-08: 3.37%
• 2006-07: 3.90%
• 2005-06: 1.40%
• 2004-05: Zero Tax Increase

Where exactly does the budget surplus go each year? (We know that it does not go the cost to providing affordable healthcare to all District employees.) The aides and paras remain without health insurance, the residents continue to receive yearly tax increases and the surplus feeds the District’s ever-increasing fund balance. According to the District, as of July 1, the fund balance has grown to $32+ million! Remember, the fund balance growth represents surplus from the District’s yearly budget. TESD’s fund balance could well represent the largest in the state.

I fully understand the impact of the pension crisis and that unless there is reform; all Pennsylvania school districts are going to fall over the cliff in the near future due to the ballooning costs. I do understand that the District must protect resources for the pension crisis but at what cost to the residents?

Other items of interest from the Finance Committee meeting included responses to Ray Clarke’s questions. By now, most of you have probably heard about the 24 Dell computers fraudulently purchased by someone using the District’s Dell account. This matter is an ongoing police investigation. Ray asked about the District’s ‘purchase process’ and Dr. Waters confirmed that it was actually the internal District controls that uncovered the purchase and there was no financial loss as a result.

Ray referenced Unionville Chadds Ford School District’s receipt of $582K in state grants for construction costs and asked if similar funding was possible for the District’s classroom expansions. Ray’s suggestion sadly was dismissed as requiring too much work for the benefit.

Ray’s comment to me regarding the 2013-14 audit is as follows:

The audited financials showed revenue of $112.9 million, expenses of $110.75 million, for a surplus of $2.15 million, compared to the budgeted deficit (before contingencies) of $1.7 million. Fully one third of the favorable variance to budget ($1.325 million of the $3.9 million) came from “breakage” – the replacement of retiring staff and approved leaves with lower cost staff. This is entirely predictable and we’ve asked for it to be included at budget time for the past several years, but every year the request is ignored and the property tax increase is 30% more than it need be, all other things being equal. There is now $31.7 million of taxpayer money squirreled away in the General Fund Balance and that’s after a $10 million transfer to the Capital Fund a couple of years ago. Perhaps since next year is an election year the Board might turn up their hearing aids.

It continues to be a struggle for residents to receive clear explanations. Materials provided often only offer partial information with many of the suggestions/questions of residents at the Finance Committee meeting dismissed or deferred. No argument that T/E School District is a great school district as all the school rankings indicate —  but is the price for the District’s success no public input allowed?

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I attended Tredyffrin Township’s Board of Supervisors meeting in the last week, and the preliminary 2015 township budget was reviewed and discussed. In addition, the supervisors held a Budget Workshop this week.  The differences between school district and the administration and the supervisors, township manager and  staff are striking.  The next Community Matters post will provide an update.

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